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Sunday, December 4

  1. page L1-10 Learning Resources edited Learning Resources, Tools, Spaces, and Materials (L1-10) L1- Books and Periodicals: For this proj…
    Learning Resources, Tools, Spaces, and Materials (L1-10)
    L1- Books and Periodicals: For this project, students will need access to a variety of modern dystopian novels.
    L2- Digital Media: Auditory learners might choose to use books on cd to “read” for their projects. Visual learners might choose to watch the movie version of their books either before or after reading.
    L3- Website Resources: The school media specialist can provide informative and authoritative websites regarding many of the dystopian novels being offered as choices.
    L4- Audio Tools: Auditory learners might choose to use headphones to listen to their books on MP3 players. Other students might choose to use microphones or computers to create recordings to use in their final projects.
    L5- Laptops: The school media center will have enough laptops available for every student to use them as needed. Students may use the laptops to research their books, create online organizers, or develop final products.
    L6- Video Cameras: The school library media center will have video cameras available for student use. Students may choose to use the cameras to film scenes or interviews to be used in their final products.
    L7- Student Work Areas: The school library media center offers a variety of student work areas. Students might choose to work on large tables, or they might spread out on the floor. At different stages of the project, students might choose to sit and read in large, comfortable chairs or to use the computer lab to research their books or create final products.
    L8- Video Production Areas: Students who choose to make videos for their final product will have access to video cameras, editing equipment, and microphones.
    L9- Presentation Areas: Students will choose to present their final products in a variety of ways. Some will use the school’s microphones and speakers to present speeches. Others might use a projector and a screen to show a video or PowerPoint.
    L10- Exhibits: Some students may choose to produce posters, scrapbooks, paintings, or other display objects as their final products.
    Works Consulted:
    Lamb, Annette. “Information Resources.” Information Age Inquiry. http://virtualinquiry.com/lab/inforesources.htm
    Lamb, Annette. “Learning Spaces.” Information Age Inquiry. http://virtualinquiry.com/lab/spaces.htm
    Lamb, Annette. “Student Generated Materials.” Information Age Inquiry. http://virtualinquiry.com/lab/materials.htm
    Lamb, Annette. “Tools.” Information Age Inquiry. http://virtualinquiry.com/lab/tools.htm

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    5:38 pm
  2. page K1-10 Key Words edited Key Words (K1-10) K1- Assignment: In a quality assignment, the learner becomes personally engaged…
    Key Words (K1-10)
    K1- Assignment: In a quality assignment, the learner becomes personally engaged in searching for and using new information. Here, students are asked to examine what qualities a dystopia might possess.
    K2- Authentic Learning: According to Callison and Lamb, “Authentic learning involves exploring the world around us, asking questions, identifying information resources, discovering connections, examining multiple perspectives, discussing ideas, and making informed decisions that have a real impact.” In this project, students are asked to compare dystopian literature and draw personal conclusions about dystopian societies.
    K3- Concept Mapping: Concept mapping assists learners in visualizing the connections or relationships between multiple concepts or ideas. These tools assist particularly assist students in addressing the “big ideas” of a project. Here, the student will use concept mapping to compare qualities of the dystopian societies in at least three novels.
    K4- Ideas Strategies: According to Callison, ideas strategies “imply methods that help the learner to both comprehend and communicate. Ideas help us move forward, to explore, and to frame questions that are meaningful to us and hopefully to others.” In this study, students will use ideas strategies (such as outlining, free writing, and peer editing) to move through the processes of analysis and project creation.
    K5- Inquiry: Inquiry can be controlled, guided, modeled, or free. According to Callison, “Inquiry is the reason school library media centers exist as learning laboratories. Inquiry is the important process that supports the mission to assure that teachers, including library media specialists, and students learn to become effective users of information.” In this project, students engage in guided inquiry as they examine the potential characteristics of dystopian societies.
    K6- Instructional Media Specialist: Previously and more simplistically known as the “school librarian,” this educational professional models information literacy, inquiry, and technology and partners with students on their quests for knowledge. In this particular project, the instructional media specialist partners with the classroom teacher to guide students in their exploration of modern dystopian novels.
    K7- Integrated Instruction: In this powerful learning tool, the classroom teacher partners with the instructional media specialist in order to develop students’ skills and understanding. Here, the goal is to expose students to modern dystopian literature and give them the opportunity to explore a variety of technological tools.
    K8- Literacy: In the modern educational world, “literacy” is far more than just being able to read. Citing Shirley Brice Heath, Callison states that “Literacy is knowing how to get information that is needed in order to get around within your environment and to get things done. Literacy is knowing how to select, reject, or revise information from a variety of access points for use in a host of different communication channels. Literacy is a dynamic skill requiring fluency in a variety of decoding situations.” In this particular project, students engage in various literacies, including critical, functional, information, media, and technology.
    K9- Organizers: These tools (which can appear in the form of online programs or printed documents) assist students in identifying connections between ideas and thus compiling their information in an orderly manner. In this project, students will use organizers to set up the points they wish to address in their final products.
    K10- Technology: Teachers and students have the opportunity to use electronic devices and other newly-developed learning tools to aide in instruction, research, storing information, and creating final products.
    Works Consulted:
    Callison, Daniel. “Assignment.” School Library Media Activities Monthly. September 2000 (17, 1): 39-43.
    Callison, Daniel. “Concept Mapping.” School Library Media Activities Monthly. June 2001 (17, 10): 30-32.
    Callison, Daniel. “Strategy: Ideas and Composition.” School Library Media Activities Monthly. May 2001 (17, 9): 36-41.
    Callison, Daniel. “Inquiry.” School Library Media Activities Monthly. February 1999 (15, 6): 38-42.
    Callison, Daniel. “The Instructional Media Specialist.” School Library Media Activities Monthly. May 2002 (18, 9): 36-40, 45.
    Callison, Daniel. “Integrated Instruction.” School Library Media Activities Monthly. January 2001 (17, 5): 33-39.
    Callison, Daniel. “Literacy.” School Library Media Activities Monthly. February 2000 (16, 6): 36-39.
    Callison, Daniel. “Organizers.” School Library Media Activities Monthly. January 2000. (16, 5): 36-39.
    Callison, Daniel and Debbie Abilock. “Technology.” School Library Media Activities Monthly. February 2002 (18, 6): 36-40.
    Callison, Daniel and Annette Lamb. “Authentic Learning.” School Library Media Activities Monthly. December 2004 (21, 4): 34-39.
    Lamb, Annette. “Key Words.” Instructional Age Inquiry. http://virtualinquiry.com/glossary/index.htm

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    5:37 pm
  3. page P1-10 Principles for Teaching and Learning edited P1- The library media program is essential to learning and teaching and must be fully integrated i…
    P1- The library media program is essential to learning and teaching and must be fully integrated into the curriculum to promote students’ achievement of learning goals: Books for the independent reading assignment will be checked out from the school media center. Before the project begins, the school media specialist will work collaboratively with the English teacher to create a list of suggested titles. As the project begins, the school media specialist will work individually with students to help them in selecting books that match their interests. The school media specialist will also help students to create final projects by using a variety of technological resources available through the library.
    P2- The information literacy standards for student learning are integral to the content and objectives of the school’s curriculum: Although the teacher has specified the overarching theme (dystopias), the project itself allows for each student to conduct a personal inquiry into elements of society that might lead to that dystopia. Though multiple students might choose to read the same books, each will choose a personalized focus for exploration.
    P3- The library media program models and promotes collaborative planning and curriculum development: The library media specialist and the English classroom teacher have worked collaboratively to create this project.
    P4- The library media program models and promotes creative, effective, and collaborative teaching: The school media specialists will take the lead in helping students to select and develop projects. The media specialist has also pre-selected or created book blurbs or multimedia clips to introduce students to the available novels.
    P5- Access to the full range of information resources and services through the library media program is fundamental to learning: Students have access to all of the media center’s production resources, including laptops, books, video cameras, digital cameras, microphones, projectors, audio books, DVDs, Kindles, and MP3 players. The school library media specialist is available to instruct students on the use of all these items.
    P6- The library media program encourages and engages students in reading, viewing, and listening for understanding and enjoyment: Students can read book blurbs or watch multimedia clips to assist them in their choice of novels. The school library media center also has a variety of audiobooks and movie versions available for student use.
    P7- The library media program supports the learning of all students and other members of the learning community who have diverse learning abilities, styles, and needs: Audiobooks, MP3 players, and headphones are available for auditory learners. DVDs are available for visual learners. Tactile learners will excel in the project production phase of the project, where they can use video cameras, laptops, and digital cameras.
    P8- The library media program fosters individual and collaborative inquiry: All students engage in a collaborative inquiry of examining the question, “What makes a dystopia?” Inquiries are also individual, in that each student explores different a different novel and chooses which societal aspects he wishes to focus his investigation on.
    P9- The library media program integrates the uses of technology for learning and teaching: Students have access to a wide variety of technological tools, including audiobooks, MP3 players, headphones, DVDs, Kindles, laptops, video cameras, digital cameras, microphones, and editing software.
    P10- The library media program is an essential link to the larger learning community: This project creates a link between the English classroom and the school library media center. It also fosters personal exploration. For some projects, students may need to reference other classroom texts or teachers (history, biology, chemistry, etc.) to explain various dystopian elements. Students’ final projects can be displayed in the media center for visitors to examine.
    Works Consulted:
    Information Power: Building Partnership for Learning. Chicago: American Library Association, 1998.
    Lamb, Annette. “Guide 3: The Learning Laboratory.” Information Age Inquiry. http://virtualinquiry.com/course/guide3.html#pr3

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    5:37 pm
  4. page dystopian lit suggestions edited ... Specials Extras author website available at http://scottwesterfeld.com/ The Hunger Games …
    ...
    Specials
    Extras
    author website available at http://scottwesterfeld.com/
    The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins
    The Hunger Games
    Catching Fire
    Mockingjay
    author website available at http://www.suzannecollinsbooks.com/
    The Maze Runner trilogy by James Dashner
    The Maze Runner
    The Scorch Trials
    The Death Cure
    author website available at http://www.jamesdashner.com/
    Turnabout by Margaret Peterson Haddix
    Shadow Children by Margaret Peterson Haddix
    Running Out of Time by Margaret Peterson Haddix
    author website available at http://www.haddixbooks.com/
    Feed by M.T. Anderson
    The Giver sequenceScored by Lauren McLaughlin
    author website available at http://www.laurenmclaughlin.net/
    The Giversequence
    by Lois
    The Giver
    Gathering Blue
    The Messenger
    author website available at http://www.loislowry.com/
    The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
    Lord of the Flies by William Golding
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    5:35 pm
  5. page dystopian lit suggestions edited Uglies series by Scott Westerfeld Uglies Pretties Specials Extras The Hunger Games trilogy …

    Uglies series by Scott Westerfeld
    Uglies
    Pretties
    Specials
    Extras
    The Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins
    The Hunger Games
    Catching Fire
    Mockingjay
    The Maze Runner trilogy by James Dashner
    The Maze Runner
    The Scorch Trials
    The Death Cure
    Turnabout by Margaret Peterson Haddix
    Shadow Children by Margaret Peterson Haddix
    Running Out of Time by Margaret Peterson Haddix
    Feed by M.T. Anderson
    The Giver sequence by Lois Lowry
    The Giver
    Gathering Blue
    The Messenger
    The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
    Lord of the Flies by William Golding
    V for Vendetta by Alan Moore

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    5:29 pm
  6. page 1984 resources edited ... {Book 1 quiz.doc} {Book 1 study guide (1984-Brit).doc} {Book 1, Ch 4-5 notes.doc} {Book…
    ...
    {Book 1 quiz.doc}
    {Book 1 study guide (1984-Brit).doc}
    {Book 1, Ch 4-5 notes.doc}
    {Book 2 blogs.doc}
    {Book 2 quiz.doc}
    {Book 2 study guide.doc}
    {Book 2, Ch 1-2 notes.doc}
    {Book 2, Ch 3-4.doc}
    {Book 2, Ch 5-6.doc}
    {Book 2, Ch 7 notes.doc}
    {Book 2, Ch 8 notes.doc}
    {Book 2, Ch 10 notes.doc}
    {Book 3 blogs.doc}
    {Book 3 study guide.doc}
    {Book 3, Ch 1-2.doc}
    {Book 3, Ch 3-4.doc}
    {Book 3, Ch 5-6.doc}
    {Goldstein's book Ch 1 notes.doc}
    {Goldstein's Book Ch 3 notes.doc}
    {Fake Photos Alter Real Memories.doc}
    {essay rubric.doc}
    {essay test on control.doc}
    {intro notes (1984-Brit).doc}

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  7. file essay rubric.doc uploaded
    5:23 pm

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